What To Put in Your XC Ski Wax Kit

So, you're new to the awesomely fun sport of cross-country skiing. You've purchased a pair of skis, boots, bindings, and poles. You've checked our our tutorials on kick and glide waxing skis and the next step is to figure out just what you need to get started waxing skis. While each skier has different opinions over what needs to be in a wax kit, below is what we recommend. We like to keep things simple! For glide wax: [caption id="attachment_3648" align="aligncenter" width="584"] The basic glide wax kit. It doesn't have to be fancy, or expensive![/caption] An iron A ski bench…

How to Glide Wax Cross-Country Skis

[caption id="attachment_3581" align="alignleft" width="286"] Just like kick wax, glide wax is selected based off of snow temperature, weather conditions and humidity...yes, I store my cheaper glide waxes all together in a ziploc bag. No judging from the wax tech's out there![/caption] We recommend a good waxless touring ski for beginning skiers but even if you invest in a waxless ski, the tips and the tails of that ski need regular maintenance. With regular maintenance and waxing ski's become better and faster. On Monday we talked about applying kick wax to grip the snow and allow us to get a good kick. Today's…

How To Apply Kick Wax

Our cross-country ski series continues today. Last week we discussed how to select ski's and the difference between a waxless ski base and a traditional waxable ski base. We also discussed how to find your kick zone if you chose to go with a waxable ski. For those of you who prefer a waxable ski today we're talking kick wax. Kick wax is important because when we transfer our weight while skiing, our ski is pushed down and our kick zone very briefly touches the snow. As a result we need a nice pocket of wax in our kick zone to…