Etiquette on the Snowshoe Trails

We're big fans of sharing the trails. When we're hiking in the summer we've got no problem sharing trails with mountain bikers and horseback riders. In the winter we think there's plenty of room for cross-country skiers, snowshoers and cyclists on fat bikes (I almost called them fat bikers...) to coexist. But, the one thing about sharing the trails is remembering to follow certain guidelines so that everyone can enjoy their outdoor experience regardless of how they are moving down the trail. As part of our snowshoe series we've discussed the history of snowshoeing, why to snowshoe, how to choose…

Etiquette on the XC Ski Trails

For the most part cross-country skiers are awesome...but every once in a while we encounter a skier who isn't aware of etiquette on the cross-country tracks, or just doesn't care. As part of our cross-country ski series we're diving into etiquette on the trails, whether they are groomed or ungroomed. [caption id="attachment_3655" align="aligncenter" width="584"] Etiquette on the Ski Trails[/caption] Rule #1: Be nice to other skiers. Faster skiers and skiers on the downhill have the right of way. If you that's you, it's good to politely call out "track," "hup," or my favorite method "on your left," or "on your right"…

Should we share unique places (and risk losing them)?

We started Just Trails to show people the amazing places they can go and visit. And to make it as easy as possible for anyone to visit those places. But I feel compelled to say something about not ruining the scenery and history while exploring. As a general rule, people should take only pictures and leave only foot prints. (I think I got that from the Leave No Trace website but I couldn't find it when I went back to look) Speaking of leave no trace; for backpacking and camping, those principles are a no brainer and can be found…